Holiday Party December 7th

Black water tanks

Forums Fish Talk Soft Water Fish Black water tanks

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Jordan October 29, 2019 at 10:02 am.

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  • #706

    Cory
    Participant

    Alright, so I’ve been looking into doing a black water tank and hope to pull some of you along with me in my journey. I’ve been intensely researching the Amazon blackwater Rivers and really want to try and all-natural approach to recreating bottom of a River basin, 6 inches of leaf litter,broken limbs, tons of detritus, The works! To most this may sound disgusting or just plain carefree. But I really want to try to get to the roots of where most these fish come from it’s practically in their DNA. So let me hear your thoughts, experiences, or ideas.

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    #708

    Cory
    Participant

    Correction not “River basin” just the river in general lol

    #714

    David Mercer
    Keymaster

    I don’t remember where but I came across a Youtuber at one point that was doing something similar, I’ll see if I can find it again. I know I have seen Betta breeders do leaf litter tanks with catappa leaves but this sounds much more intense, very cool. What fish are you planing on doing and what size tank?

    David Mercer
    AAAA Board of Directors and Webmaster

    #716

    Cory
    Participant

    Plan on doing this with a 75, I already have the sand bed and 5 Amazon swords, wanting to do Cardinal tetras, maybe an angel or 2, couple of rams, most likely corydoras , haven’t quite figured that out yet but I am open to ideas, but I do plan on having snails and small freshwater organisms to help break down the detritus. I really want a thick layer of leaf litter and allow it to break down and naturally become part of the ecosystem

    #722

    Garrett Stoykewich
    Participant

    I was always under the assumption that clear water was good, however, I’m sure you already know that blackwater is pretty discolored BUT nutrient-rich. The biggest challenge I can think of will be obtaining soft water in Georgia. Wells are prohibited in my area and using chemicals to obtain the correct levels just sounds like a nightmare. I have heard though that collecting rainwater is an easy alternative. I do not have the link but I was watching a youtube video of a guy who had a rainwater 55g setup with no filter I believe, who bred neon tetras like crazy with little to none input.

    The water is so dark that the neon tetras naturally evolved to have such bright colors to see each other.

    I can, however, offer advice for obtaining river rocks. Any local landscaping company will buy back unused pallets of rocks and sell them on-site by the pound. I paid 25cents per pound for Tennesee Flagstone (Slate), and close to the same amount (I lost the receipt) for what was labeled as Indian-River Rocks. If you’re lucky you can find some stones that have terrestrial moss already growing on them and if you plant them above water they should spread nicely.

    As for your sand bed, maybe look into a nutrient-rich substrate other than sand, rooted plants are going to have a decreased growth rate in the sand. Maybe a soil substrate and a thin layer of sand on top. Or do what the aquascapers are doing and put the soil substrate where your swords are going and make a barrier with rocks and fill the outside with sand. I think a moss wall would look good too.

    #737

    Cory
    Participant

    Actually Garret blackwater ecosystems are very nutrient poor, the only plants in the tank are Amazon swords, I buy all my substrates and Rick from a local landscape supply store everything is about 15 cents a pound but thank you for the offer. My tap water comes out at 6.5 to 6.8 at about 6 to 10 TDS I am using root tabs for the swords and as far as using leaves I’m only using locally collected materials ie.oak leaves, magnolia leaves,acorn caps alder cones and limbs from oaks.

    And believe it or not Clearwater is just what we are accustomed to, doesn’t necessarily mean that it is good. I cannot think of a lake river or stream that I’ve ever seen completely clear. I can usually see down to about the first foot but after that it’s a mystery what is under the water. What’s good to us isn’t necessarily good for them.

    so I have an update, as of 10/19/19 I’ve added botanicals listed above to tint the water in the tank is6 Venezuelan corydoras, a couple bristlenose plecostomus, and one angelfish allin the tank originally.
    I have a 300 watt hydroponics light over the 75g filtration is a small sponge filter and a marineland canister filter with an intake sponge and no carbon substrate is 3.5 lbs of aragonite (for pH stability) and about 100lbs of pool filter sand
    Let me know what you think!

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    #741

    Garrett Stoykewich
    Participant

    The only freshwater I’ve ever seen clear is glacier-fed lakes in BC. It almost looks like glass! Of course, only sturgeon live there lol. Sounds like a great setup, Had you considered C02? What height are you using that awsome light at is it LED? And have you used it before and what were the results?

    #748

    Jordan
    Participant

    I actually keep my apistogramma is blackwater. I have began to play with it a lot. It really makes the colors pop. I use mainly almond leaves I keep a bucket ( it’s a smaller tank than yours) with them soaking for water changes and top offs. A lot of people will use moss in their filter as well to maintain the tannins. I’m interested to know where you sourced alder cones locally if you don’t mind me asking. Birch cones can also be used instead of alder cones.

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